“Places and traces” by Viv Corringham

Reading Aimilia’s fascinating writings based on Spaces Speak, Are You Listening – a book I found very interesting – I thought I’d write a little bit about the work that I do.

I am particularly interested in people’s sense of place and their relationship with very familiar places.  Much of my work has developed in response to this, especially my ongoing sound project Shadow-walks. This began in 2003 and has occurred in 19 places in USA, Canada, Asia and Europe. It involves three main elements: walking with others, listening to environmental sound, and my own improvised singing.

There are well-known traditional links between walking, singing and the sense of place, such as the Aboriginal song-lines or the Kaluli song paths. Anthropologist Steven Feld studied the Kaluli people of Bosavi, Papua New Guinea and has described their practice of song paths, the poetic song texts that take listeners on a journey through a local area. The philosophy of song paths is that knowing where you are is knowing who you are. Feld’s writings were an important influence in the development of my work.

I became very interested in everyday sounds, inspired by working with composer Pauline Oliveros and learning her method of “Deep Listening”. My fascination with environmental sounds and musical improvisation led me to consider methods of exploring places and interacting with them vocally. My first attempts, in 2002, were called “Vocal Strolls” and became a regular show on London’s Resonance FM radio for a time. Vocal Strolls consisted of wandering through the city while listening to the environment and responding with improvised singing.

Shadow-walks began with the intention of incorporating other people’s experience of place into my work. James Joyce wrote that places remember events and I found this idea very interesting—that everything that happens leaves traces that we might be able to sense. So that if a person walks through certain places repeatedly along the same route, perhaps the ground retains traces of that person’s history and memories. Shadow-walks is an attempt to make a person’s traces, their shadow, audible.

The process of a Shadow-walk is straightforward. I arrive in a new place and ask to be taken on a special walk, one that has been repeated many times and has meaning or significance for that person. While walking together, I record our conversations and environmental sounds. This is followed by a solo walk in which I attempt to sense my previous companion’s traces on the walk and to make them audible through improvised singing in the location. These recordings are then selected and edited to become the final work, the Shadow-walk. Shadow-walks have been shared in various ways: as audio-walks, radio pieces, at listening posts around a town and, most frequently, as sound installations in art galleries. It is very important to me that they are presented in some way in the place where they were made, to the people who shared their special walks with me.

World Listening Project Announces New Web Feature

The World Listening Project is pleased to announce a new guest blogger initiative. In the upcoming months guest bloggers will be writing about changing soundscapes, new listening practices, new recording techniques, reflections on recent events, interdisciplinary connections to acoustic ecology, and other topics that resonate with WLP’s mission. Blog authors will include Susanna Caprara, Linda Carroli, Björn Eriksson, Joel Chadabe, Simon Hampson, Aimilia Karapostoli, Joseph Young, Andrea Polli, Jamie Davis, Brandon Mechtley, Abigail Anderson, Leah Barclay, Viv Corringham, Jerome Joy, Pietro Bonanno, Jez Riley French, Maile Colbert, Emeka Ogboh, Andrea Williams, Steev Hise, Mara Maracinescu, Renata Roman, Guillaume Chappez, Steven Miller, Perdita Phillips, Aaron Ximm, Martha Riva Palacio, with more authors to be announced in the coming months.

We look forward to hearing and reading new perspectives that help us to better understand how important sound is in our world. Check for updates at www.worldlisteningproject.org!

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