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Why is Sound Important?

  National Park Services, 2011 World Listening Day “Some of our most profound experiences in life are not seen; they are heard.” Check out the new National Park Services’ web page for 2011 World Listening Day, from the Night...

Joensuu Soundscape Composition Contest 2011

The deadline for soundscape compositions has been extended from June 3 to June 5, 2011. Website: www.ilosaarirock.fi/popkatu/2011/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=16&Itemid=24 Facebook page: www.facebook.com/pages/Joensuu-Soundscape-Composition-Contest/134542189950523 The theme of this year’s contest is “Transforming Localities”. Learn about about other events, new calls for submissions, festivals,...

2011 World Listening Day, July 18

The World Listening Project (WLP) and Midwest Society for Acoustic Ecology (MSAE) invite you to participate in the 2011 World Listening Day on Monday, July 18.

Here are several possible ways to participate:

  • Organize a soundwalk.  What is a soundwalk? Start here
  • Organize a performance event that explores soundscape and how we can listen to our sonic environment.
  • Participate introspectively by simply paying attention to your soundscape.
  • You can facilitate an educational event that relates to acoustic ecology, field recordings, or a similar topic.

The level of participation in 2010 was amazing. We would like to see if we could double or even triple the number of participants worldwide this time. If you would like to participate in the 2011 World Listening Day, please download and fill out the 2011 World Listening Day participation form. Then email it to <worldlistening@gmail.com> with “World Listening Day” in the subject line.

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2011 WORLD FORUM FOR ACOUSTIC ECOLOGY CONFERENCE

2011 WORLD FORUM FOR ACOUSTIC ECOLOGY CONFERENCE

Crossing listening paths

IONIAN UNIVERSITY, CORFU, 3-7 OCTOBER 2011
CALL FOR SCIENTIFIC AND ARTISTIC CONTRIBUTIONS

Soundscapes are seldom simple; on the contrary, they tend to be complex sounding systems continuously changing in time, which no art or science can approach in depth on its own. Listening is the “corner stone” for the appreciation, participation and study of the sonic environment that surrounds and includes us. As Westerkamp (2002) remarks, it is the ecological balance of our planet that becomes audible “to those who care to listen.”
Continue reading 2011 WORLD FORUM FOR ACOUSTIC ECOLOGY CONFERENCE